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Chinese, US presidents agree to further relations
2005/09/14

2005-09-14

    Chinese President Hu Jintao and US President George W. Bush agreed here Tuesday to enhance mutual trust and cooperation and make concerted efforts to develop bilateral constructive and cooperative relations.

    The two presidents held talks Tuesday afternoon right after Hu arrived here to attend the summit on the 60th anniversary of the establishment of the United Nations.

 

    During the meeting, Hu pointed out that the two countries have made important progress in the past few years in exchanges and cooperation in bilateral and international affairs, with their common interests being increased, spheres of cooperation expanded and their cooperation basis becoming increasingly solid.

    He cited the progress in bilateral anti-terror cooperation and economic and trade cooperation, effective bilateral consultation and coordination in such international affairs as the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula, the reconstruction of Iraq and Afghanistan, the Middle East peace process and the UN reforms, as well as the continuously enhanced bilateral cooperation in coping with such global issues as fighting transnational crimes, the prevention of HIV/AIDS and environmental protection.

    He said healthily and steadily developing China-US relationship is in the interests of both peoples and conducive to peace, stability and development of the world at large, and should be treasured by both sides.

    He suggested the two sides maintain the momentum of high-level visits, make full use of and continuously improve the bilateral consultation and cooperation mechanisms in various fields, and attach importance to strategic dialogues.

    Hu said that in recent years, the Sino-US economic and trade cooperation has undergone rapid development where mutual benefit and a win-win situation predominate. But due to the rapid and large-scale development concerning the trade ties, the emergence of some frictions and disputes are inevitable.

    China will properly settle bilateral trade disputes through dialogues and consultations in line with the principles of equality, mutual benefit and common development, said the Chinese president.

    He also said China will reinforce the protection of intellectual property rights and make greater efforts to crack down on pirating activities in various forms.

    China will work with the United States to address bilateral trade imbalance through trade cooperation, and hopes the US side will ease its restrictions on exports to China, particularly its high-tech exports, and take corresponding active measures to enhance the trade balance between the two countries, said Hu.

    He said China will also work with the US to expand cooperation to new areas such as finance, civil aviation, service trade and energy.

    Hu urged the United States to properly handle the Taiwan question and expressed the hope the United States will understand and support China's efforts to improve the relations across the Taiwan Straits.

    On the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula, Hu said he hopes the parties concerned would demonstrate full flexibility with a constructive attitude and a down-to-earth manner to push for new progress in the second-phase meeting of the fourth round of the six-party talks that started in Beijing on Tuesday.

    Bush expressed his regret over the postponement of Hu's visit to the United States due to the disaster brought about by Hurricane Katrina, hoping Hu will visit the United States at the convenience of both sides.

    The US president said he expects to visit China after the informal meeting of APEC leaders scheduled for November this year.

    Bush said the US-China relationship is very important for the United States, and both he himself and the US government attach great importance to it and will strengthen consultation and cooperation in various fields with China.

    The US side also places much importance on bilateral strategic dialogues, said Bush.

    On the Taiwan question, Bush said the US side understands it is a highly sensitive issue and its one-China policy will not change.

    He said bilateral economic and trade cooperation is conducive to the two peoples and the world, hoping both sides will further expand their market access.

    Bush also hoped the two countries will strengthen cooperation in the protection of intellectual property rights.

    He thanked China for its important role in the six-party talks aimed at resolving the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula and reiterated that the US side will insist on resolving the issue diplomatically through the six-party talks.

    The two heads of state also agreed to strengthen cooperation in the prevention of bird flu.

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